Walker Walking

CANCER FUNDS

CHOOSE YOUR IMPACT.
CHOOSE TO CONQUER THE CANCER THAT MATTERS MOST TO YOU.

Nearly one in two Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime and funds raised through the Rexall OneWalk are vital to support the transformational research, world-leading clinical enhancements and supportive care programs for cancer patients at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre.  The Rexall OneWalk to Conquer Cancer is a fully supported, bold, endurance walk spanning two days and uniting a thousands of passionate walkers with a common cause:  to Conquer Cancer in our Lifetime.   Funds raised by participants benefit the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, one of the Top 5 cancer research centres in the world to deliver future care now.  With OneWalk you Choose Your Distance. Choose Your Impact. Conquer Cancer.  Participants choose to fundraise as a team or individually, and designate their fundraising dollars to support the cancer fund that matters most to them.

When a participant registers, they select a cancer fund to support, such as: Discovery Research, Breast, Gynaecologic, Lung, Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary, Genitourinary, Blood Cancers, Endocrine, Skin Cancer and Melanoma, Head and Neck Cancers, Central Nervous System Cancers, Brain and Eye Cancer, Sarcoma, Childhood Cancers, Supportive Care, Patient Education, and Radiation Medicine.

Discovery Research

To achieve global impact, a scientific research institute requires world-class people, platforms and programs. The Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre is fortunate that many top scientists have left their homes to come to Toronto because they believe that this is where they can have the most impact.

The Institute is building world-class research programs utilizing our expertise in the scientific platforms most vital for cancer research: mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, new drug discovery, genetic sequencing, biobanking and computational biology.

Breast – Metastatic, Hormone Receptor +, HER2+, Inflammatory, Triple Negative, Locally Advanced

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Canadian females, accounting for 13 percent of all female cancer deaths.  One in 8 Canadian women are expected to develop breast cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 31 will die from it.  Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers). It is the 2nd leading cause of death from cancer in Canadian women. Breast cancer can also occur in men, but it is not common.

In 2017, an estimated:

  • 26,300 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. This represents 25% of all new cancer cases in women in 2017.
  • 5,000 women died from breast cancer. This represents 13% of all cancer deaths in women in 2017.
  • On average, 72 Canadian women were diagnosed with breast cancer every day.
  • On average, 14 Canadian women died from breast cancer every day.
  • 230 men were diagnosed with breast cancer and 60 died from breast cancer.

Gynaecologic Cancers – Uterine, Cervical, Ovarian and Vulvar Cancer

In 2017, it was estimated that:

  • 1,550 Canadian women would be diagnosed with cervical cancer
  • 7,300 would be diagnosed with uterine cancer
  • 2,800 would be diagnosed with ovarian cancer

The most recent incidence statistics for other and unspecified female genital organ cancers are from 2013:

  • 955 Canadian women were diagnosed with other and unspecified female genital organ cancers

The most recent mortality statistics for other and unspecified female genital organ cancers are from 2013:

  • 280 Canadian women died from other and unspecified female genital organ cancers

Lung Cancer

It is estimated that in 2017:

  • 28,600 Canadians will be diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • 14,400 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer
  • 14,200 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer

Gastrointestinal, Colon, Rectal and Stomach Cancer

Approximately 26,800 Canadians were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2017, representing approximately 13 per cent of all new cancer cases in 2017.

  • Approximately 14,900 men were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and approximately 5,100 died from it.
  • Approximately 11,900 women were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and approximately 4,300 died from it

It was estimated that in 2017, 3,500 Canadians would be diagnosed with stomach cancer.

  • 2,200 men would be diagnosed with stomach cancer and 1,250 will die from it.
  • 1,300 women would be diagnosed with stomach cancer and 790 will die from it.

The five-year relative survival for stomach cancer is 25 percent. This means that, on average, people diagnosed with stomach cancer are 25 percent as likely to live 5 years (or more) after diagnosis as people in the general population who do not have cancer.

Colon, Rectal and Gastrointestinal

Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in cells of the colon or rectum.

In 2017, an estimated:

  • 26,800 Canadians were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. This represents 13% of all new cancer cases in 2017.
  • 9,400 Canadians died from colorectal cancer. This represents 12% of all cancer deaths in 2017.

Genitourinary, Prostate, Testicular, Bladder and Kidney Cancer

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 21,300 men would be diagnosed with prostate cancer. This represents 21 percent of all new cancer cases in men in 2017.
  • Approximately 4,100 men died from prostate cancer in 2017. This represents 10 percent of all cancer deaths in men in 2017.
  • On average, 58 Canadian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer every day
  • On average, 11 Canadian men will die from prostate cancer every day

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among Canadian men, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer.

Testicular Cancer:

  • Approximately 1,100 Canadian men were diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2017
  • An estimated 45 died from the disease

Bladder:

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 8,900 Canadians would be diagnosed with bladder cancer and 2,400 Canadians would die from bladder cancer
  • 6,700 men would be diagnosed with bladder cancer and 1,700 would die from it
  • 2,200 women would be diagnosed with bladder cancer and 680 would die from it

Kidney Cancer:

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 6,600 Canadians would be diagnosed with kidney cancer.
  • 4,200 men would be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 1,200 would die from it
  • 2,400 women would be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 670 would die from it

Head and Neck Cancer

More than 4,300 Canadians will develop cancer of the head and neck this year; nearly 1,610 of them will die from it.

Blood Cancers: Lymphoma and Leukemia Cancer

Lymphoma

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 990 Canadians would be diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma
  • 140 Canadians would die from Hodgkin lymphoma
  • 570 men would be diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma and 85 would die from it
  • 430 women would be diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma and 60 would die from it

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 8,300 Canadians would be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • 2,700 Canadians would die from non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • 4,600 men would be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1,500 would die from it
  • 3,700 women would be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1,200 would die from it

Leukemia

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 6,200 Canadians would be diagnosed with leukemia
  • 2,900 Canadians would die from leukemia
  • 3,600 men would be diagnosed with leukemia and 1,650 would die from it
  • 2,600 women would be diagnosed with leukemia and 1,250 would die from it.

Endocrine – Thyroid Cancer

In 2010, 135 Canadians died from endocrine system related cancers. Because these cancers are so rare, prognosis is not well known.

Sarcoma Cancer

More than half of soft tissue sarcomas begin in the arm or leg. In 2013, 1,255 Canadians were diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma.

Skin Cancer and Melanoma

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 7,200 Canadians would be diagnosed with melanoma.
  • 4,000 men would be diagnosed with melanoma
  • 3,300 women would be diagnosed with melanoma
  • 80-90 percent of skin cancer cases are caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Childhood Cancer

Childhood cancer accounts for less than one percent of all new cancer cases in Canada.

The three types of cancer that account for the majority of new cancer cases in children 0 to 14 years of age in Canada are:

  • Leukaemia – 32 percent
  • Brain and central nervous system – 19 percent
  • Lymphomas – 11 percent

The three types of cancer that account for the majority of cancer death in children 0 to 14 years of age in Canada are:

  • Brain and central nervous system – 34 percent
  • Leukaemia – 26 percent
  • Neuroblastoma and other peripheral nervous cell tumours – 11 percent

Childhood cancer is relatively uncommon. However, it remains the most common disease-related cause of death more than asthma, diabetes, cystic fibrosis and AIDS combined. It is second only to injury-related deaths among Canadian children. In 2012, cancer was the leading cause of disease-related death in children under the age of 15 years.

Between 2009 and 2013, there were 4,715 new cases of cancer in children 0 to 14 years of age in Canada, an average of 943 cases per year. Between 2008 and 2012, there were 595 cancer deaths in children 0 to 14 years of age in Canada, an average of 119 deaths per year.

An average of 290 people in Canada between the ages of 15 and 29 die from cancer each year. Young men are more likely to die than young women in this age range.

  • Radiation therapy is a critical treatment for children with cancer and The Princess Margaret has the largest paediatric radiation program in Canada
  • As a partner with SickKids, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre participates in numerous Children’s Oncology Group clinical trials and is involved in leading research in the field.

Hepatobiliary: Pancreas, Liver, Biliary Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 5,500 Canadians were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer
  • 4,800 Canadians died from pancreatic cancer

Liver Cancer
In 2017, an estimated:

  • 2,500 Canadians were diagnosed with liver cancer
  • 1,200 Canadians died from liver cancer

Biliary (or Bile Duct) Cancer

Bile duct cancers are divided into 2 main groups based on where they start – either in the part of the bile duct outside the liver (extrahepatic) or in the part inside the liver (intrahepatic).

Rare types of bile duct cancer can also develop, these include:

  • Sarcoma
  • Lymphoma

The 5-year relative survival for all other and unspecified digestive organ cancers is 19%. This means that, on average, people diagnosed with other and unspecified digestive organ cancer are 19% as likely to live 5 years after their diagnosis as people in the general population.

Brain, Central Nervous System, and Eye cancer

It was estimated that in 2017:

  • 3,000 Canadians would be diagnosed with brain and spinal cord cancer
  • 2,400 Canadians would die from brain and spinal cord cancer
  • 1,700 men would be diagnosed with brain and spinal cord cancer and 1,350 will die from it
  • 1,300 women would be diagnosed with brain and spinal cord cancer and 1,050 would die from it
  • 55,000 Canadians currently live with brain tumours

Eye cancer is rare. Since 2013, approximately 335 Canadians have been diagnosed with eye cancer:

  • 175 men were diagnosed with eye cancer
  • 160 women were diagnosed with eye cancer.

Supportive Care

The Supportive Care Department at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre is an innovative global leader, supporting patients and families at all stages of the cancer trajectory. Through clinical care, research, education and international partnerships, we continue to pioneer new approaches for patients and caregivers as they cope with the impact of cancer.

With over 50 specialized staff working with each of The Princess Margaret oncology clinics, the program sees more than 2,000 patients a year. They treat physical and emotional symptoms, such as pain, depression and anxiety, and assist patients and their caregivers in managing the complexities of cancer and treatment. The program supports patients and their caregivers from the time of diagnosis, through survivorship, to the advanced stages of cancer.

Supportive Care aims to pursue continued growth and evolution in its three key areas:

  • Psychosocial Oncology
  • Palliative Care
  • Survivorship and Cancer Rehabilitation.

Patient Education

As a global leader in patient education, The Princess Margaret offers programs that encourage and enable people with cancer, their caregivers and their families to become active participants in their cancer care. Providing an environment where patients and families feel safe to learn and ask questions is part of how we do this.

Through hospital-based services and online communities that promote self-management and improved quality of life in the hospital, at home and in the community, we help people, no matter where they are in their cancer experience, get the knowledge, skills and strategies they need to make informed decisions and healthy lifestyle choices—and cope with the many challenges that cancer brings.

We bring our expertise in health communication, adult education and theories of health behaviour change to all our Princess Margaret practitioners, working with them to develop educational resources, including patient-centred curricula, pamphlets and videos.

Our patient support includes:

  • Classes and programs
  • Community Connections
  • Patient & Family Library
  • Online education & support.

Radiation

The Princess Margaret uses cutting-edge radiation technologies and has the capacity to treat over 8,000 patients every year. The Radiation Medicine Program at The Princess Margaret the largest of its kind in Canada and one of the largest in North America. A team of radiation oncologists, therapists, physicists and nurses support the assessment, planning, treatment and follow-up care for common, rare and complex forms of cancer. For more information about the Radiation Medicine Program at The Princess Margaret, click here.

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